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Costco Wholesale Corporation

COSTNASDAQ

466.40

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-20.77
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36.72P/E
29Forward P/E
1.83P/E to S&P500
206.598BMarket CAP
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Don't get my started with cars. They are the single biggest financial disaster. About $350k cost per car per lifetime uninvested, so over half a million invested. https://www.mrmoneymustache.com/2011/10/06/the-true-cost-of-commuting/

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Ok let me know what total cost of ownership is while u rent for 2 more years just to buy at 7.5% and then maybe refi in 10 years

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Thanks. My cost basis is 113 now and GOOGL makes up about 5% portfolio.

That's why I'll wait. I want to add lower and bring my basis down to 100 or less.

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I can build a brokerage platform, but its gonna cost u

Also ur gonna have to find customers urself, and get licences etc

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I wouldn’t worry about the blacklisting. FAANG company recruiters tend to be persistent and unless there’s a good reason (cough nonregretted attrition cough), they won’t hold this against you. Moving for work is never a slam dunk and everyone values everything differently.

That said, I’d say go for the job. It does carry significant risks, but I think the benefits are worthwhile, assuming you can stick it out for two years: besides the likely doubling or more of your annual total comp, having a company like this on your resume tends to make you more attractive to other companies even years after the fact. And the simple fact about a higher cost of living area is that everything tends to scale up, including what’s left over after you pay your bills.

However, you are right about the work life balance thing, and the higher you go on the ladder, the worse it will get. And that would be the main thing holding me back. If I’m happy where I am and making excellent progress towards my financial goals, then I wouldn’t go changing everything. I see it like compound interest: if I’m expecting to work the next 20 years, then making a move now could significantly improve things over time, even if I only stay two or three years.

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Stay calm and don’t panic sell. Dollar cost average. Take the sage advice from Buffet and buy when others are fearful and sell when others are greedy

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So how do average people retire? Social security and hope their home is paid off so cost of living is low?

By my math, my wife and I will need around $2 million saved in the next 25 years to retire comfortably. . .

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I think it's a mutually beneficial arrangement.

The landlord is losing significant opportunity cost by locking in the rent at a well below inflation increase for 2 more years during a period of high inflation...but they'd also benefit from not having to find a new renter, so asking for an extra 2% per month to hedge against what the market rate COULD be is reasonable.

Think about an ARM. We accept a higher interest rate for a fixed loan to not have to take on the risk of an ARM (most people do, anyhow). That, to me, is a better analogy of what's happening. You pay a slightly higher rate to buy a longer period of stability.

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Have you ever looked at living in a 5th wheel, rv, camper?

Cost of living is usually a lot less than traditional apartments, house, duplex.....

It takes being a bit more organized. We sold our home and went back to living in a 44' 5th wheel. We have the financial side to do it with style, but years ago we started in a 28' 5th wheel with 5 kids, 2 adults, and 5 small dogs. It was some if the best memories my kids have. Now we do it with 2 adults, 4f full-time, and 3 other children under 15 yr 50/50.

All of our bills equal about $1000 a month, maybe $1200 with Starlink internet now.

Could be a good start.

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Honestly, I think it's worse if we don't. A slow bleed will cost more and go on longer with much more pain than a hard and fast correction. This is why I don't think JPOW is being effective. He should have said "fuck it, 5%" on the first rate hike and spooked the shit out of the markets. Big crash, get it done, and move on to recovery. Instead we'll bleed out on these weak ass raises which won't be enough to spook companies into accepting lower margins.

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I’m paying 2% with Clover with around 900k annual revenue. They’ll try to set you up with a higher rate but you can negotiate.

It definitely adds up but it’s the cost of doing business these days. 80% of my transactions are through a card.

Bake it into your price. Cash only businesses leave money on the table imo

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This could be a path, but your lack of knowledge will cost you here. Educate yourself very well not just in the concepts but the actual process flow of starting, building, and running a business with this model.

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You said the mortgage was equivalent to a risk free treasury.

I can sell my treasury at any time (liquid) and at minimal cost (transaction fees). All treasuries are fungible.

Once I pay off some part of my mortgage, it's tied up in a house. I can't get that capital back without expensive transaction fees. And, it will take a (long) while. Meanwhile, my particular house might have suffered damage or be in a blighted area or declined in value for whatever reason while other houses did not. My house - and the equity tied up in it - is not fungible.

> For the reasons I explained in my post.

Your reasons are obviously wrong. As I pointed out above, paying on your mortgage is not equivalent to a risk free investment like a treasury.

Even if it were, so long as the market returns > than the mortgage and I am willing to accept the risk, then it is wholly rational to invest in the market. Do the math. Over any long period, the super vast majority of investors will make money arbitraging mortgage against market returns.

Finally, you neglect inflation. Today, paying down extra on your mortgage is simply locking in a loss relative to inflation. You can't easily get that money back later to put into the market due to liquidity and transaction costs.

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  1. take your 300k and do what you plan
  2. take remaining 100k out of EJ and put in a low fee custodian (schwab, vanguard, fidelity)
  3. invest in no commission, low cost index funds

Check out Paul merriman website or talkingrealmoney.com for a lot of good, easy, diy advice.

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I like to use the affordability calculator on Zillow. With no other income, property tax waived, and 6% interest on the mortgage, you can afford a roughly $179k house.

I live in NJ too, and the cost of shelter here is terrible. Best of luck.

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And we realise the dividends of those items by 1. Being possible and 2. The low cost of those items.

It's safe to say that any forced tax would be baked into the consumer price... So UBI benefit is already there... Rather than costing you 40+ hours of work for a loaf of bread, it only costs you 15 min. It's already baked into the price.

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You are the only one that can remove your name from the deed. You file a quit claim deed with the county. Do not do that if you are still on the mortgage! The only way to get off the mortgage if for him to get a mortgage without you. He has to refinance the current mortgage in his name only. He should have done this while rates were low. Now he is going to have to get a higher rate.

Do you need to worry? Not if he will repay the mortgage without default. He could decide to stop paying any day he feels like it and you are just as responsible for it as him. If he dies suddenly, the mortgage is yours. But the house is only yours if you have kept your name on the deed. In which case you could sell it and (hopefully) pay off the mortgage with the proceeds.

Having all of this tied up in your name will also be hindering your own ability to get loans either for your own housing or a car or whatever. It is probably best to take care of it all now and make a clean break. He might drag his feet on the mortgage part because he is likely going to have to pay more in interest and also cover the cost of the refi, but tell him it is less costly than ending up in court.

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Get out of California. Cost of living will bleed you quicker than a bad investment.

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We could, but then they really would cost $15k each.

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Absolutely, and thank you for the reply!

Since we are brainstorming, and no bad ideas I have a couple other possible suggestions.

  1. At the end of the day, who are your customers and what do they want that they can’t have?

  2. How could you improve on a current business model to provide more value?

My guess is a Food Truck’s largest cost isn’t the food, it’s just driving the thing around and having enough efficiency to get as many customers to you or for you to serve them.

What if you were able to offer Free Delivery to expand the range of the food truck?

Spoiler alert, you need to basically eliminate your cost from delivery to make this at all work. The answer? A low cost EV solution. Basically zero to operate, easy to expense/depreciate but now you are only limited to labor which can be free from you or a partner until you scale it and can hire someone.

Example 4th of July you go park your a mobile Movie Theater and have a couple EV scooters/car/bikes to crush deliveries.

Who wants to wait in line? What if your delivers also we’re like ice creame guys and you had a few fresh bags of popcorn or cotton candy made as well? People buy AND you get exposure.

How great would it be to be sitting with your family at the beach, fireworks or any other large gathering and have free delivery to you instead of going to wait in line? Easy add one like bottled water to increase your margins and the list goes on.

Don’t let anyone stop you, their opinions of you are not your business, that’s their business.

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I think I did a $300 Eurail pass and would pass on it in the future. I felt tied to the trains even though flights were way more cost effective for the time spent and most of the time booking the trains would have been similarly priced by booking directly.

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Got it, thank you. That was my understanding and plan. I was trying to see if there is an exemption.

Although I don't see what games I'm playing because if the loss cannot be realized but instead gets assigned to the cost basis of the shares I bought in the last 30 days, if I'm selling those too, I'm realizing the loss aren't I? So maybe there is a wash sale but it's immaterial because I'm turning around and also selling the other shares so the net impact is the same?

Or is the loss assigned to the cost basis of all remaining shares I have of the security?

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If you're worried about the money, transfer it to another account at a different bank, just as everyone is telling you. However, I'm very curious about the part of your story that's going unsaid. Why are you so afraid of your parents? Are they mega rich or something? Will claiming this money cost you even more in the long run when they cut you off? Why do they want to take some money back? Are you irresponsible? Did the notion of simply moving the money to a safe bank really never occur to you? I feel like there's something more going on here.

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Could be very interesting, as usually it's actually the life insurance that limits people. Because obviously an older person is a higher risk of passing away so less companies will insure them. And no insurance = no mortgage in the UK right now. But with people living in general longer and healthier lives that may change. Hopefully something can be done to help people actually get on the ladder at a younger age but with the cost of houses...yeah, it's a mess.

There's actually mortgages in place in Japan that can have terms of ridiculous length (like 100years) that can be handed down generations. So those of us in countries like the US, UK and europe could be worse off I suppose!

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My reasoning is that the invoice from my vendor shows a cost breakdown of each item that is lower than my actual cost per item when you factor in shipping. If I can just go ahead and deduct all “freight in” costs when I receive the goods then it just makes figuring out my COGS easier and in the grand scheme of things would be the same. Except I would deduct the entire shipping costs the year I received the goods whereas in the other example I only deduct a portion of the shipping or “freight in” charged each time I sell an item. I just don’t know if this is allowed or not. I mean I already paid the entire shipping charges when I ordered the goods. It is a valid expense and it seems to me you could do it either way. You’re still deducting the same amount just a different method.

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My auto jumped 25% just renewed recently largest jump I’ve ever seen so far. They stated because cost of repairs are up inflation just hurting everything.

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4000 a month in rent for someone in their 60s is with 1.5 million is not the best idea. Do basic math: if you retired now, you might expect to live into your 80s...25 years maybe? That means you will need 25*4k = 1 million. The issue is that is HOUSING ALONE assuing no inflation of rent. Of course you need not retire and may invest (although that brings nominal downside risk along the real risk).

Take a look at the cost of long-term care: unless you are able to get rid of your $ in an intelligent way so you qualify for Medicsid long term care, you will eat that out of pocket. The sad thing is this money will be eroded away with medical and long term care costs quite quickly in your twilight years.

No one has the answer for you- it is based on expected cash flows, the quality of life you want, and the risk you are willing to assume

That being said, coming from someone with a net worth in the tens of millions of dollars and who was a long term care and Medicare expert for awhile:

  1. Being poor and very old sucks. Your top goal probably should be avoiding this.

  2. Instead of say a $40k SUV, why not buy a used $25k SUV? Buy a car that gets the job done, well, has non-trivial mileage, and typically has resale value. Low mileage used trucks or subaru outback turbo for those who don't need a truck but need a large SUV.

  3. Upgrading to a nicer apartment is fine and will probably give you the best quality of life improvement over the long run. $4k is a lot for 1.5 million, at your age, unless you also plan to have other income for a long time. A $2.5k apartment would be much more sustainable and yet a big upgrade probably.

  4. Pay someone to help with a financial plan.

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Man I would keep trying to live on that 4000 income. You could move somewhere with a lower tax burden and buy a comfortable house in cash. Probably nor in California though. I don't really know what it cost out there but I've heard it's insane expensive. 4000k mortgage is a lot. I mean that is a lot of house and really expensive. 1.5 mil is a nice chunk but if it's not Making income then you gonna run out very quickly I think. You could buy a house on the water in some areas around the country or even in another country for less in cash and only have to worry about the tax and then keep your 4k a month to spend on whatever you want and still have a big chunk in the bank or generating some type of income passively.

If you spend 4k a month it would go through 1.5 mil in 31.5 years.

That's the biggest problem I think is figuring out how to invest in something that actually makes money. I don't know how to do that. Wish I did or knew where I could learn that.

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Yes I’m talking about the shipping bringing the good into me. If I’m sitting on some inventory at the end of the year can I just go ahead and write off the entire shipping cost for the shipment or do I divide the shipping cost equally among the items and sit on that as well until I sell those items? Just trying to see if I can include it this year to have a bigger deduction. Can you do it either way or do you have to do it one way?

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$1.5 million sounds like a lot of money--and it is, if you were getting it (say) once a year for the rest of your life.

But it's not a lot of money. Assuming you live another 30 years--not an entirely unreasonable assumption--$1.5 million divided by 30 years is $50,000 a year, or about $4,000 a month.

>Is $4000 a month in rent unrealistic now?

It is unrealistic.

>How about it a new SUV for $40,000?

That's also unrealistic.

I'm also concerned with the advise others have given about finding a professional adviser. Sure, that's a good way to go assuming you can find an honest one. But a lot of people have lost a lot of money--including some very famous folks--because their advisor was less than honest. (And sure, you can take them to court--but is that how you want to spend the rest of your days?)

Here's what I'd so--and this is based on my own experience with my wife and I receiving a similar (though larger) windfall a few years back. We're in our 50's.

(1) Find an investment firm which is reputable and set up an account with them. (We use UBS; I'm happy to PM our own advisor's info to you, though they are located in Florida. She may be able to suggest someone else to talk to who is local to where you live.) Make sure you set up an account with a reputable firm with an advisor who is also a fudiciary advisor. (A fudiciary financial advisor has a legal and ethical commitment to put your financial interests first over theirs.)

(2) DO NOT change your spending habits or buy anything major until you've had the money for perhaps a year, so you understand what the money is doing. (In my wife and my case, we waited a couple of years before drawing on any of the money.)

I know, I know; you finally have the opportunity to make your lives better--and here I am telling you to wait.

But that's very important, because if you don't know how the money is performing and you don't understand the tax ramifications of how your money is invested--you can get yourself caught off guard and find it's not as much money as you thought.

And the worst thing in the world you can do right now is to over-spend beyond your money's capacity to support you. (The internet is full of people getting a sudden windfall, only to blow that money and find themselves even poorer than they were before.)

(For example, last year, because of unexpected capital gains, we wound up owing about $60,000 more in taxes than we had expected. That involved a very long conversation with our financial advisors--and spending more money than we had planned that year. We're fine, and I understand what happened--but these sorts of unexpected events can come along and you need to be prepared for them.)

(3) The only exception I'd make to the first two points is if you have any debts. If you have (say) $20,000 in consumer debt or a medical bill--go ahead and pay them off immediately; that way you are reasonably debt free.


Now after a year of waiting, knowing how your money is performing (because if your advisor is worth their salt they'll ask if you intend to save any to give away to children or relatives in inheritance, and they'll ask you your risk tolerance--which at your age should be low--they'll then put some in the domestic stock market, some in the foreign stock market, and some in municipal bonds), you can then decide how much money you're willing to risk taking out each year and not be in that awkward position of hitting 80 and having no money left.

And that may mean modest changes to your lifestyle. Like an extra $2,000 a month in rent, or a nice used car.

And given your windfall, depending on how connected to where you live, you may consider--as my wife and I did--moving to a lower cost-of-living area.

The amount of money you'll have actually will support a fairly nice standard of living nearly anywhere not in a major urban (high cost of living) area.

But that's not a decision to make anytime soon. Right now, the decisions you have to make is (1) where to park the money, and (2) understand the money before you start asking it to support you.

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The mountain is crowded and all the out of towners have caused the cost of living to skyrocket. The amount I’m paying in Bend would get me a house in Eugene with a garage but here it only gets you a one bedroom.

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>valuations matter

Someone here once said shame on me for preferring to buy Tesla at 600 instead of 1200. A 2x difference in cost basis is a pretty big deal. No wonder why most redditors don't beat the market.

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Owning a stock does not equal understanding a stock, and your google thesis seems to be of the same vintage as your buy.

I agree that not owning the whole stack has a negative impact on quality. I see it as closer to MS, especially since new iterations of Android OS do have spec mandates. I think the quality gap is immaterial when you look at the cost delta. Androids are everywhere and will continue to be everywhere. The developing world isn’t coming online with iPhones, hardware manufacturers are using IOS powered integrated tablets. The adoption and technical moat to build a true competitor is massive.

QQ, what competitors do you see with better tech than google? Google hasn’t been focused on search or driven by search for over a decade.

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Saving 20% is very healthy.

What are you saving the 20% for?

What is it invested in now?

How much does it cost to be invested in that?

How is it performing?

How do you expect it to perform?

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It will be True if she included the 960 lb bale of hay gor the month, $200 monthly cost to feed the cow. .

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Hey, I mean this is your business. If you think there’s a demand for it, by all means go for it! I think you just have to be careful of your competition. Because there are vendors like GoPuff that offer a wide variety of snacks (granted no movie theater popcorn or movie theater swag) at a lower cost point and fairly quick delivery.

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Margins are insane. Labor is the biggest cost usually and it’s zero.

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Some questions for you.
* Do you have access to any project management system where you can see their progress?
* Have they given you a burn down chart showing you when things will be completed?
* Do you have a development roadmap you can refer to with costs / time estimates attached?
* Have you _ever_ gotten any competitive quotes to get an idea about how these prices match up to other organisations in the market?
With regards to the last one, if you do get a quote that is much cheaper that doesn't mean the service will be any good, so it's just worth mentioning to them to see if they can give some idea as to why there is a cost difference. This all depends on what sort of relationship you have with them, of course.
Regarding the first three, there are all _must haves_ and if these don't exist then they need to. Talk to your team about getting this set up. If they don't have the resource to do this themselves, then you need a project manager of some description.
The other alternative is to get a contractor in with experience in this field to do an audit of the code and get a sense of what they are doing. Ideally someone with a good reputation who does this sort of thing for a living (and has some good testimonials).

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There are specific life insurances that cover mortgage cost, and the value goes down with the mortgage! I agree with the above and suggest you look into that.

Source: I am licensed to sell insurance

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Right to comment said hood and I mentioned they have around 6 B in cash, then the response was yes they have a lot of money and seem to be cutting on cost but they can go Bankrupt just like 2008.

Idk just feels like a cop out statement, I’ll grant you the last part those companies are almost worthless

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Recession is reflection of GDP and not quite correlated to customer sentiment.

Most business are affected by the latter.

Don’t let a recession/scarcity mindset give you an excuse to sit back or accept poor result.

I’m in leisure and healthcare IT. No signs of slowing yet. On one hand I’m not in denial that changes are on the horizon for sentiment at the same time I’m not going to accept the idea that a “recession” is valid reason for business slowing of/when when it does. It’s too convenient of an excuse. There still going to be billions/trillions of dollars being exchanged…

Focus on value vs cost. Find higher value customers. Go where there’s money being spent. Differentiate from competition.

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Cabinetmaker. Vertical integration. We’ve been buying bulk lots of material from competitors closing. Buying a raw material that costs $100/sheet for pennies adds up fast. Adding a veneering line so we buy veneer only and only press what we need further reduces expenses. Adding a moulder and milling our own trim instead of buying it milled has helped. The machine and tooling are assets, not expenses. Milling our waste into smaller components and stocking them has reduced our material cost and waste cost. Pressing our sawdust into pellets for heat is the next avenue we’re exploring.

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I have had refurbished Lenovo's x220 and x230 for more than 10y. They cost around 300 bucks and do the trick.

With a docking station, you can enjoy 2 screens and keyboard. When you go on holidays, you can store it away.

If it breaks, you get a new one. Amazing laptop.

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Act like you're still poor. Continue to shop affordable stuff, and make little purchases of things you will get use out of. A $40k SUV? seems pricey, but if you will get tons of usage out of it, maybe. Get a hybrid perhaps? Save on gas with an upfront cost (like a rav 4 or Toyota highlander).

Don't buy expensive clothes / flashy items / things you wouldn't have before. There's no need to change your lifestyle, just be more comfortable. Take a little 1-2 week trip. Go out to a nice dinner once in awhile.

At the grocery store shop as usual but don't fret if 1 or 2 things are overpriced. Don't act like you're suddenly a different person...

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It takes a doctor longer to build net worth than it takes a tradesman, because of all the years of education and low-paid training and the cost of the education, but a doctor's net worth typically surpasses that of a tradesman once he reaches his early 40s. A doctor may also be able to work longer, because he doesn't experience the same physical wear and tear that can come from working a blue collar trade. Any individual tradesman could out-earn an individual doctor over a lifetime, of course, but, on average, doctors have higher lifetime earnings and higher net worth.

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As previously stated here, you cannot have car insurance before you have a car. The insurance cost is based on the car itself as well as some other factors, but credit is not typically one of those (and you absolutely do not need credit to get car insurance). You purchase the car first then find and buy your insurance policy next. I would find an agent locally that works with a variety of insurers to find you the best rate for the coverage you're looking for. Purchase the car, then stop by the agent's office on your way home.

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First step would be to move somewhere with significantly lower cost of living.

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$4k rent is absurd and will probably only get worse. Reduce expenses. Maybe decide to retire in a lower cost area. You can get a mortgage on a decent house for half or less than what you’re currently paying on rent. $40k for a new vehicle probably won’t happen much anymore either. It’s like $50k+ for a regular 6 cylinder truck now!

Investing strategy would be to buy good dividend producing stock and sell covered calls on it. But you said you don’t know anything so I wouldn’t try that suddenly with no experience. Maybe get a money manager person. I dunno. Good luck

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It's a rule of thumb, so you can adjust up or down depending on your circumstances. If you adjust up, you will need to cut back in other places or you will end up becoming house poor. The only way to know what you personally can comfortably afford is to write a budget and then adjust how everything else will change if you move your house payment up and down. I would include property taxes and insurance along with the principle and interest payment for your "monthly mortgage" cost.

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In another comment you reference some vehicles, I would recommend getting a loan against those. That's a fairly easy/quick process, and will cost way less than the interest you are proposing.

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Learn from it. Just buy the index ETF's. Gives you instant diversification and mends up beating almost lal of the pros over time. It is also extremely low cost. Like Warran Buffett tells his family. Keep 90% in VOO and the rest in cash.

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I don’t think they destroy it. That would be wasteful for the cost of production. Even if the did, it comes back to balance sheet. Does a business hold every dollar in a vault? No.

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Fasted on record so far, wouldn't be surprised if we hit a new record in the next month or two. I'm just hoping for a warm winter for Europe this year. I'm actually surprised volume hasn't increased even more along with lower commission brokers.

I guess the average person still thinks of options as super risky, rather than a way to control your exposure to risk. Everyone I know IRL avoids them like the plague. But I think it's weird to not adjust risk based on your situation.

For example, I wanted to add to my SOFI position but wasn't sure if it was going to drop more. So I picked the price I'd be willing to double down at and sold puts at that price (OCT 21 $5) at $0.28. Basically in a month I'll either have bought shares at a cost of $4.72 or I'll have made a 5% return for that portion of my account that month. Either way I'm happy with the results.

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Stocks will go back up then. So these bears can suck it as I cost average down on leaps and shares

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I got into investing with the mindset of whatever money I invest, it is consider "spent" and I will never see it again because my timeline is 5-10+ years.

It's been reinforced watching this forum, I've always kept ~6+ months and it's wild seeing people talking about having to sell stock at a loss because they have to pay bills.

Also reinforced is don't play with options or short-term trading, seeing people lose their ass on essentially gambles. I've noticed a lot of people here talk about opportunity cost too on holding onto losers and in many cases it comes off as "sell low and roll the dice again".

My biggest advice that has also been reinforced, is work on yourself and make more money and throw it in index funds. I personally tripled my income just by working on my interviewing skills, I'd rather rely on myself than external factors like the stock market to build wealth.

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You can refinance the lower cost house when rates go down.

Dumb ass.

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First, I wouldn’t tell your friends and family. The less they know the less likely they will come after you for lawsuits of their own.

Next, move from California if you can. Move from your high cost of living state to a lower one. You could buy a nice town home and not have to worry about the exterior maintenance of yard work etc.

Lastly buy reliable affordable cars.

All in all you should spend roughly 350,000 to 500,000 for everything outlined, ideally less if you can swing it. park the rest and let it earn you money.

Realistically, looking at average life span, you and your wife will live between 10 and 20 years, if you are smart with what has been provided you can set yourself up to not have to worry about this phase of your life. Whatever you do, do not let the money allow your spending to creep up. That is the fastest way to lose it all. Goodluck!

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> Guess that depends what you consider hefty. My HOA is $280/month and that includes a lot of other things like water, trash, exterior maintenance, pool, etc. So yes I am paying more than $250 a year for insurance when you factor in the master policy cost but my original point to all this still stands- taxes and insurance can be very low compared to a mortgage payment.

I would consider a $280/month HOA hefty, yes.

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Two things right off the bat.

First, congratulations! You should be very proud of yourself for getting to this point! Well done you!

Second, if you are interested we have a Marketing Message Toolkit that we would be happy to offer you as our gift if you are interested. It will help you help you implement what we are going to talk about into your business, minus some of the headaches. Just let us know if you are interested and we will see you get it.

Okay, so lets take the points of your question one by one. Your key phrase (effectively market) is spot on!

Your first step is to identify whom you are marketing to. That would be mom. The next question is, how does mom make her decision to buy? What is her tipping point? Her buying decision is a process. It usually start out very practical based out of need. Her darling kiddo has out grown their_________ and needs a new one in a larger size.

The truth is, their are a ton of ____________ already on the market. So, what makes her choose to buy a specific ___________? What would make her choose to buy your ________?

Two things, and they are different. The younger the child or baby it is all about emotion. How cute is it? How sweet is it? What emotion does that outfit evoke in mom when she sees this outfit that she also wants everyone else who sees her child in that outfit to also feel and acknowledge? "Oh, what a darling outfit! So-and-so looks so cute in it! Where in the world did you find it? (AKA-you are a good mom and you made a good choice).

However, as the child gets older the scales shift and practicality, durability, cost, and ease of maintenance become her higher priorities. She is tired, she is usually on a stricter budget, she has more laundry to do, and yet she still wants to feel and be acknowledged that she is a good mom and her child still looks great in their new outfit.

Her "pain-points" are your marketing points. Your brand and products solve her problems and bring her the positive emotions her exhausted heart an mind are looking for.

Now let's talk about building your brand.

Two words... Consistency and integrity.

To build your brand your messaging needs to be consistent. Over time your customer base recognizes your messaging as YOUR BRAND. It's like hearing the old Coke jingle on the tv. Even if you were in the next room you knew it was a Coke commercial because of the jingle. You don't need a jingle, but you do need to keep your messaging consonant.

Last thing, and this may be the most important, especially right now given the evolving business, economic, and political chaos. Integrity must permeate every single aspect of your business if you want to be successful, and that includes your marketing messaging. If you can't give a bargain price on something because you are using a higher quality item to make it, that is okay. Use it as a selling point. Just be honest about it.

One last tip. Based on what we see coming down the road we would strongly encourage you to take a very close look as every aspect of your supply chain and source locally to your area as much as possible.

I hope this has helped you a bit and we wish you every success!

Warm regards,

The Spectrum Post Team

TheSpectrumPost.com

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>local broker

Are local ones cheaper or more expensive than the major providers?

>Will my insurance cost be higher because I don't have credit history?

^Any idea about this?

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If you are going to be home shopping, pay attention to "cost per square foot". Some 70 year old houses around here are more expensive than new construction on a cost per square foot basis, but it's slowly started to move the other way now.

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How is his cost avg for Voo 0

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Have a friend that owns a pretty hopping restaurant here where I live, and their corporate is already going hard on preparing for massive declines in the coming months. They're rolling out all sorts of deals, such as entire take home meals for 10$ for each customer as long as the dish they take home is the same price or less as the dish they ordered in the store. I realize that this is anecdotal, but it's also a corporate chain restaurant (and this store in particular did 5 million in sales last year, which is a significant amount), so if they're basically giving entire meals away at cost just to drive business for the foreseeable future...well...that's probably not a great sign.

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$7-8 clm and crf with a dividend reinvestment policy at nav, about 20-30%less than marlet price...helps reduce cost basis

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Guess that depends what you consider hefty. My HOA is $280/month and that includes a lot of other things like water, trash, exterior maintenance, pool, etc. So yes I am paying more than $250 a year for insurance when you factor in the master policy cost but my original point to all this still stands- taxes and insurance can be very low compared to a mortgage payment.

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I assume if you sell now you would split closing costs and split liability/profits. If you buy out and sell later you'll have to absorb the cost of selling yourself. Let us know what you decide and how it turns out. Everyone here wants the best for you.

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You dont need credit history to buy car insurance but you do need a car.

First you need a general idea of what car you are going to buy, say a 2017 Camry. Then call an agent , and get a ball park estimate on the cost. You can call several to see who will give you the best rate.

When you actually buy the car, you can call again to actually purchase the insurance while still at the dealership. They may or may not ask for payment over the phone so be prepared. You will need insurance before you drive off the lot.

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That's roughly in line with inflation. If things cost 10% (or 9.2% or whatever you're using as the inflation rate) more for the insurance company, then they have to get that money from somewhere.

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They CAN b good, but they ARE expensive. ‘Lower’ priced fast food like POPEYE’S CHICKEN Usually starting at $250k (usd) in liquid assets/cash. Real estate you have to buy or lease, build-out/equipment may NOT be included. Very good credit score. You have to stick to ALL the franchise systems & products plus ususally a % (@5%) royalty’ on sales monthly paid to the franchise. Make sure the franchise ADVERTISES. You’d b surprised how many don’t. (Burger King can prob. cost at least $500k liquid cash just so they consider you. GLTU.

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The bottom is definitely a better deal, you can pay it off early more aggressively or refinance to avoid the interest rate, but the top interest rate is already low and the total cost is so high you can't make a dent with early payments.

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Take profit early and often. Have a set amount that you’re willing to have in each position and take profits when it goes over that limit. You can always buy back in with the profits when it inevitably goes lower while also lowering your cost basis.

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You would hope costs of labor would also go down since cost of living is less, but yes they would have to cut spending.

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If you mean General Liability, there are two issues for GL:

  1. Whether they're covered

  2. how much it costs to cover them

While, generally speaking, most policies will cover uninsured subs, some policies do have either exclusions for subs, or limitations for subs that might exclude coverage if certain conditions are not met. Whether you have a policy that contains those limitations is not something experience can guess at, your policy either has exclusions/conditional limitations regarding subs or it doesn't, and reading it is the only way to know for sure.

Second issue for GL is premium. Generally speaking, the premium rates for work done by insured subs is much lower than that for employees doing that work. If you use uninsured subs, then at least for construction work, you will get charged for what you paid for that work, based on the higher rate charged for employees.

You said you are not necessarily talking about construction. Construction work is usually charged based off payroll and sub costs, operations other than construction are often charged on gross revenue, not payroll, so it's more complicated to determine how or whether you're paying more for uninsured subs. No way to really comment on anything else without knowing what kind of operations you are referring to.

The above is General Liability. If you mean coverage like Employment Practices, Cyber, Errors and Omissions, etc, those are much more complex. It'd be unwise to even try to guess at those without a copy of your policy in one hand and full details on the contractual terms of your relationship with the sub in the other.

There's another side to this though. Even if your insurance does cover them, if you actually consider them an independent sub and not an employee, you should want them to have insurance. First reason is perceptual: Some insurance companies get the idea that uninsured subs are not properly supervised or trained, and since they aren't insured either, that your business is a bad risk. this can make getting insurance difficult or more expensive. Or it could make renewing it more difficult if your insurance doesn't find out about using uninsured subs until later on.

Second reason is, if the sub causes a loss that would have been covered by their own insurance, if they had it, but is covered by your insurance instead, that loss could make your premiums go up. If that sub stops working for you after that, you're stuck with the fallout of increasing insurance premiums. If they purport to be an independent contractor, wouldn't you want them to commit to the insurance cost that comes with being independent?

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This is great advice to get a job there. That would give you great insight fast. Or at the very least, befriend someone who does work there and pick their brain. It is critical to understand Chesterton's fence on this one. Because from the outside, though I don't know that industry, I am a manufacturing expert. Including having designed and built complex custom automation equipment myself. I look at this and my assumptions of the existing process and personally see something that does nothing but make a simple existing process add significantly more cost and time. But the very important thing is to only half listen to people like me because I don't know that industry. And more importantly I am not your target market. The most important opinion to matter is specifically the person you would sell it to.

On patents, I disagree completely. I have seen doing that too early make it harder to license, not easier. Long story on that. But as far as what specifically you possibly could patent. You can easily just not show that part for these early steps. And save yourself a lot of money and risk. Then once you do get to a point that you have to disclose your specifics, get a provisional instead.

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Higher deduction is not really a benefit. Sure use it for cost analysis but the goal is always to have a lower cost.

Also, deductions are capped at 10k unless an investment property.

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While I no longer live in the Netherlands my pijler 3 pre-tax investments, both pensioen as well as jaarruimte, are invested in low-cost broadly diversified index funds. So in a sense that's fairly similar to a 401k.

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lol like what people stated below.. OP home prices are to far apart for this to make sense.

The numbers don't add up lol at least not for the same/similar house.

In reality mortgage doubling doesn't mean home prices drops by about 30%. In actuality, I think what OP meant to write is that as rates increase, people can afford less home due to monthly payments increasing. So they have to now look at small/lower cost homes just to be able to pay the same monthly fee as the 600K home due to the higher rates.

In OPS senario, the cheaper home at the higher rate for the same house makes more sense as you are paying the same monthly installments for the same house at a lower price point.

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I love that in 21st Century America, the only way our super rich economic leaders see to reign in inflation that is clearly driven by corporate greed is to further punish the poor and working class until enough of us starve to bring down demand for things like food and housing. Corporations are enjoying record profits across the board. This isn't a supply chain driven inflationary period, or a cost driven inflationary period, it's a greed driven inflationary period.

Congratulations America! We are about to be punished severely for the actions of our super rich overlords, who will no doubt get even richer as we get even poorer.

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The bias as stated makes your scenario impossible:

> When companies demonstrate genuine social responsibility

​

This phrasing eliminates any skepticism; for any example you MUST assume that it is entirely TRUE that Company B has shown that it benefits society (i.e. the world you live in).

You are modifying the statement of the bias. Which, I agree with. I don't believe the bias, as stated in the OP is a real bias. It sounds impossible for it to be a bias.

The bias needs to be stated differently.

​

This is besides the point above, but it's also not clear that "lowest price at point of sale" can be said to be rational. Consider buying two cars:

Car A, a normal gas-guzzling car that gets 10miles/gallon for $5,000.

Car B that is a hybrid EV that gets 150miles/gallon for $10,000.

If you assert that it is always rational to buy the lowest priced product, then it means no one should ever buy Car B.

But over just 1 year of driving, if you live in California in 2022 for example, gas is $6+/gallon. If Car A has to commute 40 miles to work every day that would be $6,240 spent just on commuting gas for Year 1. Meanwhile, Car B will only have to spend $415.98 for the year on gas. This shows the total COST for Car A is $11,240 in Year 1, and the COST for Car B is $10,415.98.

Under the assumption that someone can afford either car, how can it be rational to choose based on price, rather than cost?

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Let's hope the new pension system in the Netherlands will change this for the better. The Dutch system does have some benefits: relatively low cost (no marketing, high volume also drives in down cost) and risk sharing (collectivity).

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Get your self a good used car. Look to stagger your funds into money markets then 3,5,7 yr Treasury notes this gives you different intervals to give you plenty of time to make informed decisions while taking advantage of recent rate hikes with out having any worry about the stock market swings. You might end up with some SP 500 index funds but you don't have to jump right in. Do you want to stay in expensive So. Cal is there somewhere else that would give your retirement greater freedom and flexibility? If your worried about being close to family.. If you moved somewhere where your cost of living is cheaper could you fly in your family so as not to still spend so much. Remember this money is for you don't squander this or give it away to other family and friends. They can visit you while you remain comfortable and give them a weeks vacation staying with you while you remain safe and comfortable. Good planning not luck will be your biggest advantage.

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Okay but here’s the thing

  1. It’s easier to have X percent down.
  2. Interest rates will fall again once inflation cools. So we can refinance at the 2.5% with the lower house cost.
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I’m still dollar cost averaging down 😂.

Although it is now 50% of my portfolio 😵‍💫

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No, that same house does not cost $390k.

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He is a commissioned sales person and you are going to cost him some sweet cash if you put your money in a GIC at a bank.

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I read something saying housing prices usually lag mortgage rates by up to 18 months, which makes sense for a market that is so iliquid.

Two years from now will probably be a great time to buy, if not sooner if we crash into a recession. But yeah, right now your staring down ~50% more in mortgage payments from 9 months ago despite the small cost dip

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More like $250k for a home in foreclosure. But yeah I’ll take the high interest with lower closing cost and refi when rates recover.

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You can also buy down your rate but it’ll cost ya

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People like to throw this around like its simple. Refinancing cost money and isn't always the best options for someone.

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Exactly, people moving from the west isn't gonna make cost go up, increase strain on resources, which leads to homelessness because..... oh

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What the fuck is up with the math in these stupid ass housing memes. This is not what those mortgages cost.

Maybe it’s that people don’t know how to calculate the constantly accruing interest and the actual monthly payment amount. Or maybe it’s that they conveniently forget that a mortgage entails other costs like property tax that will be included in your monthly bill. So they can minimize the current housing CRISIS.

But this is not actual fucking cost of either of those options. Maybe that’s the joke? But I doubt it because no one seems to get it.

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I'd think the other way. If covered under your policy, that's your cost. You want that?

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Why the same mortgage if the cost is 40% less? There is no obligation to ask for a 100% mortgage. This meme makes no sense.

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Yeah damn it's called the down payment. Gotta get past that "we aren't sure if you can pay this at half the cost of your rent now so we'll charge you 20% interest" payment.

Do people not actually know why younger people aren't buying homes? Its not that we don't want to pay 50% or less compared to rent it's that its hard to come up with 20-30% down to not get double fucked and continue to waste money.

We aren't stupid. We're poor.

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If you set up a take profit and they stop loss when you made the purchase of each asset, leave it alone and don't second guess yourself. If you start second guessing yourself after you put your plan in motion, then you didn't plan for the worst case situation up front in which case you've already lost. Reacting after the fact isn't going to help you now. Let your plan carry out and hope for the best.

If you didn't set a take profit and stop loss, then you have quite a few options available depending upon your trading style and you are trading goals. Options like accumulation are good ways of dealing with an asset you really want to keep. It also leaves you open to just getting out of an asset that might not be as strong as you thought it was.

There are no clear-cut answers and really the only one that can make the final decision is you based upon your risk assessment risk mitigation, and budget. If you have the budget and the patience, you could just do nothing and see if the market simply recovers.

Ultimately, you could get rid of the weaker losers and reinvest in the stronger potential winners. No matter what course you take though, once you've take it it's done. Thinking about what you should have done after the fact becomes a dead issue because you won't be able to change it or undo what you've not.

All you can do at this point is either hope for the best or take strategic losses and plan for reinvestments but either way it's all after the fact of the original decisions. Looking at a chart now is somewhat pointless and thinking about what you could have done when you placed the trade in the context of regrets.

Looking in the chart on the basis of what information you might have missed is always invaluable and leads to better trading in the future. What technical indicators might have helped you see data that you've missed or maybe there was something within the company's fundamentals that might have helped you make better decisions. All of which is speculation because, at the end of the day, for better or worse, you and you alone have to feel comfortable about what you've traded and be able to sleep at night.

This is probably not the advice you want to hear, but I don't know if anybody can really give you legitimate advice that's going to cost you losses in the future that is or should be considered proper to your situation. Only you can make those choices about your finances and your situation.

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If that's a real question, they issue debt in VND which is pegged to USD. Other countries with free floating currency (Thailand, for example) have let their currency devalue against the USD, which allows them to service their debt at a lower cost. Thailand also has a certain control over the value of their currency.

In this environment, having your debt in USD is expensive on a relative basis versus other currencies. The USD is outperforming pretty much every currency, and most assets.

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That's what life insurance and a trust is for. I mean you don't have to leave your family in shambles when you die. If I kick the bucket today, my wife is FI/RE and the kids have everything paid for until they're into their 20s, including our very good public university about three miles away. All for around $50/mo and a one time cost of $2000 for the trust.

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Part of the property management company’s cost is insurance to cover damages.

But yea that was my biggest hang up. I guess looking for confirmation in either direction.

I should have specified it isn’t feasible for long. I’d say I couldn’t do more than about four months before I really started to get hurt.

The risk doesn’t seem worth the reward from what I’m hearing. It makes sense. I’ll keep my path of paying down debt and building resources until I can take advantage of the next opportunity.

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If buying options you only need enough to pay the opening debit. Depending on a number of factors you should be able to buy a long call for below $500, so this could be all you need to start. Look at the cost of the option and not the cost of the stock.

Experienced trades know that exercising is a hassle that brings in lower profits plus delays the process by days and adds some level of risk.

Don't exercise as a standard part of trading!!

Instead, buy to open the option at whatever debit you are paying, then sell to close the option to be out right away with any profit or loss. Once closed, you can move on to finding and making the next trade to repeat . . .

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