US stock · Financial Services sector · Financial Data & Stock Exchanges
Company Logo

MSCI Inc.

MSCINYSE

448.17

USD
+15.39
(+3.56%)
After Hours Market
47.49P/E
34Forward P/E
1.83P/E to S&P500
36.422BMarket CAP
0.90%Div Yield
Google Trends
Recent Reddit Comments

No. Honestly I just never thought about how ETF providers would have to pay licensing fees to index providers. But it makes sense of course and I think the idea of "investing in passive investing" is very intriguing. However I'm doubtful about the timing. Do you really expect ETF AUM to rise beyond expectations in the coming years? That seems to be necessary to profit from such a play. MSCI [World] ETFs are prime tool of retail investing and in the current or near-future environment I don't see our grandmothers anywhere near the ETF markets.

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

I think, perhaps wrongly, that MSCI recives a licensing fee proportional to the amount of money tied up in an index. 2021 Annual Report (Page 40). Do you have other information?

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

How is MSCI "picks and shovels" here? Why would their income scale with the popularity of passive investing?

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

Index providers like MSCI. Picks and shovels vs mining companies. Also, MSCI has had better operating income growth over the past 10 years than Blackrock, although both have performed well.

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

Hello all,

I have a limited set of 401k options and I was wondering if it makes sense to switch to a self-managed fund with Ameritrade that the company also offers. Doing so would require a 75 dollar per year upcharge and restrict my contributions to 25 percent company 401k and 75 percent self-managed. So, I would still have to put 25 percent into the funds I am less familiar with. My goal in doing this would be to have access to VTI + VSGX, but realistically I'm probably just overthinking it and the other funds are pretty comparable. What do you think about this distribution with the company 401k, versus a similar distribution with VTI, VSGX, and a few small-mid cap ones?

60% State Street Equity 500 Class K

15% iShares MSCI EAFE International Fund Class K

10% T. Rowe Price Dividend Growth Fund Class I

10% Vanguard Mid Cap Index Fund Admiral Class

5% Vanguard Small Cap Index Fund Admiral Class

Any help is really appreciated.

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

Hello all,

I have a limited set of 401k options and I was wondering if it makes sense to switch to a self-managed fund with Ameritrade that the company also offers. Doing so would require a 75 dollar per year upcharge and restrict my contributions to 25 percent company 401k and 75 percent self-managed. So, I would still have to put 25 percent into the funds I am less familiar with. My goal in doing this would be to have access to VTI + VSGX, but realistically I'm probably just overthinking it and the other funds are pretty comparable. What do you think about this distribution with the company 401k, versus a similar distribution with VTI, VSGX, and a few small-mid cap ones?

60% State Street Equity 500 Class K

15% iShares MSCI EAFE International Fund Class K

10% T. Rowe Price Dividend Growth Fund Class I

10% Vanguard Mid Cap Index Fund Admiral Class

5% Vanguard Small Cap Index Fund Admiral Class

Any help is really appreciated.

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

>Thanks for admitting you didn’t understand anything in my post, or deliberately taking the my words of out context.

I did not, but ok.

​

> I’ve pretty clearly stated that any reasonable investor will use a wide range of ETFs. That means I’ll have SPY ISVL DIVO BST along with some international ETFs in my portfolio too and that still only makes up only a part of my ETF portfolio.

That is good for you, but you don't make most of the invested money in the market.

ISVL: 153m AUM

DIVO: 1.4b AUM

BST: 1.1b

SPY: 362b and there are S&P500 indexes from Vanguard, Blackrock etc.

The reality is, that most of the Indexes are SPY and MSCI World. That is just how it is.

> It’s not ridiculous that I’ll not know many international small cap value companies and I don’t think it somehow negates anything I’ve said. In fact in reinforces the fact that many investors like myself will choose ETFs based on strategy like “intl small cap value ETFs” or “large cap value blend with high dividends and covered calls for extra income” etc (you get the point)

I think it is ridiculous, not knowing what you invest in - but you do you. You once again extrapolate your strategy to others. The numbers don't lie.

​

>Please study the ETFs market properly and don’t limit yourself to QQQ SPY and ARK, there are many, many more less known funds which provide a much better diversification and returns over long term

Dude, we are not talking about if the index funds have great returns or are diversified or not. We are talking that due to the market flow of the big ETFs like SPY, MSCI World indexes etc, the prices of those assets gets artificially inflated like it happened with ARK in an extreme case.

The argument was wether or not, these influence the markets and underlying assets, not if they are the best strategy or not.

Anyway. Good luck in your investment journey,

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

> He said the rise of ETFs means that certain companies are overvalued and others are undervalued and it’s somehow a bubble?

But it is. Index investors blindly buy companies like Apple and while they are not ridiculously overvalued, they still are.

​

> Most of ETFs are diversified af with a huge blend of large cap, small cap, mid cap

The biggest ETFs are S&P500 and MSCI World, no small caps.

​

>anyone who knows anything about investing will have a good blend of diversified ETFs

Most people who invest in ETFs don't know about the market, and invest due to their 401k or with a savings plan.

​

>When I look at holdings of my ETFs I’ll probably stop recognizing the names of the companies after the first 10 which is exactly how it’s supposed to be.

You don't know more than 10 companies of the S&P500 and say that ETFs creating a bubble is ridiculous. Please study the market and how inflows skew investment returns (ARK investing into small caps and pushing them up with high inflows would be an example, what is happening in the ETF world at an extreme case).

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

Hello all,

I have a limited set of 401k options and I was wondering if it makes sense to switch to a self-managed fund with Ameritrade. Doing so would require a 75 dollar per year upcharge and restrict my contributions to 25 percent company 401k and 75 percent self-managed. So, I would still have to put 25 percent into the funds I am less familiar with. My goal in doing this would be to have access to VTI + VSGX, but realistically I'm probably just overthinking it and the other funds are pretty comparable. What do you think about this distribution with the company 401k, versus a similar distribution with VTI, VSGX, and a few small-mid cap ones?

65% State Street Equity 500 Class K

10% iShares MSCI EAFE International Fund Class K

10% T. Rowe Price Dividend Growth Fund Class I

10% Vanguard Mid Cap Index Fund Admiral Class

5% Vanguard Small Cap Index Fund Admiral Class

Any help is really appreciated.

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

It's not guaranteed but the long term average is around 10%.

You want a total market index funds as

iShares Core S&P Total US Stock Market ETF

iShares Core MSCI Total International Stock ETF

With just those two funds you own practically every stock in the world and capture their average returns. You'll pay no fees out of pocket to own them and they have a very low expense ratio 0.0X% which works out to around $50 per $100k invested.

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

In your case a broad market ETF like IWDA (iShares Core MSCI World) might be the best option for you. Also I think Netherlands does not tax capital gains (I am not sure, so you need to look it up), if that is the case choosing an "accumulating" ETF would be better than "distributing" one, so that the dividends are reinvested without cutting taxes. IWDA is an accumulating one.

But do your own research as well, everybody's situation is different.

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

>smartest yet least effort way

ETFs.

Depending on what you prefer, MSCI World or a combination of MSCI World + EM or an ETF tracking the S&P 500 (I believe iShares has the highest volume and more or less the lowest fees).

You might be able to get more information on r/investing, r/ETFs or r/personalfinance

IBKR may actually have the US variants of these funds available since it's an american company, which would obviously have even higher volume.

About splitting up: It really does depend on whether or not you pay order fees. At my broker, I pay €5.90 per order, so investing in little increments like €250 would make no sense. As for setting up a plan to regularly invest once per month for example, that drops the fee to €1.90.

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

Dumb question, but I heard some guest on CNBC talk about MSCI rebalancing on May 31, and that you will be able to get good deals on that day. Just wondering what that means, and why that would happen?

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

Dumb question, but I heard some guest on CNBC talk about MSCI rebalancing on May 31, and that you will be able to get good deals on that day. Just wondering what that means, and why that would happen?

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

Same/same, but with a seven-year gap between my BA and MSci. My first job out of undergrad paid $34k, and that was in LA.

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

The TSP international fund is managed by BlackRock and tracks the MSCI EAFE index. It is therefore basically identical to the EFA ETF. I would encourage you to compare EFA to VXUS and see if you can find much difference. This is not to say that VXUS is a bad choice - it's just more that I wouldn't do anything unnatural to avoid TSP I fund.

And as others say, look at your overall allocation - not account by account. Pick an asset allocation for your portfolio and use a spreadsheet to track it.

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

I was also considering this one. The only reason - which I agree is probably irrational - is the way it got slaughtered since December. The performance is almost identical to MSCI World for the past 6 months (-10% MSCI world vs. -8% iShares Aggregate Bond). Therefore I asked myself what the value of putting my money there is, if it gets hammered the same way as stocks.

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

2

In little over a year Mr Xi’s policies have had a profound impact on global markets—and a painful one. They have knocked $2trn from Chinese shares listed in Hong Kong and New York. Chinese initial public offerings in these two cities have nearly ground to a halt this year. China’s property firms have sold just $280m in high-yield dollar bonds so far in 2022, down from $15.6bn during the same period last year, according to Dealogic, a data provider. Within China, the value of yuan-denominated financial assets held by foreigners fell by more than 1trn yuan ($150bn) in the first three months of 2022, the biggest drop ever. The Institute of International Finance (iif), a bankers’ group in Washington, forecasts that a total of $300bn in capital will flow out of the country this year, up from $129bn in 2021.

Onshore markets were one of the linchpins in China’s relations with the outside world. The belief that they would continue to open up and yield high returns helped to maintain links with powerful, Western financiers hoping to strike it rich. Even as relations between America and China soured during the Trump years, and a trade war dampened global sentiment, an exuberance for onshore securities took hold of many of the world’s biggest financial groups. As relations with the West deteriorated, regulators in Beijing began expediting long-promised reforms, eventually allowing foreign financial groups to wholly own their onshore businesses.

The policies were a clear sign that Beijing meant business. And the West reciprocated. In 2018 msci added Chinese shares to its flagship emerging-markets index. Several other index inclusions followed, leading to a windfall in inflows into onshore Chinese securities. Between the start of 2017 and a peak at the end of 2021, foreign financial exposure to yuan-denominated assets (stocks, bonds, loans and deposits) more than tripled from about 3trn yuan to 10.8trn yuan.

That elation is now quickly dying off. Many foreign investors simply grew too enthusiastic about China in recent years and chose to ignore the risks, says Hugh Young of Aberdeen, an asset manager. The market is now waking up. The view from many investors is that, although China has never been more open to foreign capital flows, it has also not been this ideologically inflexible in recent memory.

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

If you have no degree, as you are having your talk with the person responsible in charge of getting you onto the chain of command, be truthful, honest and talk about the things you know and the things you don't know and what kind of expectations you are having about the amount of physicall labor you are able to do. Plumbing requires a lot of thinking about where certain fluids go to. Firstly you should look into getting enough accolades so that you are able to show your achievements when it matters. If you want to leave your parents you should at least have a passport and enough money to support your lifestyle. Best ETF for long term is MSCI World as it depicts the world index of the major companies that exist in the world, weather or not to go to your local bank or use an online trading platform is up to you. Another real estate ETF is probably available somewhere near your trading office. Never give up, just keep going.

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

I use the MSCI Global Impact ETF. It's kinda tech and pharma heavy; I haven't checked the whole list. Perfomance-wise, it's been... fine. I started moving some of my portfolio from a broad index fund over to that one like 9 months ago, which was bad timing -- it's only gone down (even when the rest of the market was moving up). But in the past 6 months it's lost less than S&P, so ???

I didn't do a lot of research before coming across this one, so I'd be curious to hear what you end up deciding on!

Sorry so many people are telling you not to invest sustainably. I know I might FIRE later if I avoid fossil investments, but that's a choice I'm making.

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

iShares Core MSCI World All Cap ETF (ASX code: IWLD)

Can't you access this one?

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

Yeah, I personally don't want exposure to emerging markets as I don't feel the risk premium is worth it and I also have ethical trepidations about investing in China or several other emerging markets included. Historically developed markets have had decent returns so I don't mind setting my international allocation to the MSCI.

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

How about a better debate...

VXUS vs MSCI world index

Seems like it may just be better to own global large caps and avoid taking on the risks of emerging markets.

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

I might have gone a bit overboard with my portfolio... So far its been quite stable during rocky days.

I have added more cash into the market in the past month than in the previous year.

​

|Name|%| |:-|:-| |Apple|8.99| |BRK.B|7.11| |iShares Global Agg. Bond ETF|6.45| |iShares Core S&P500 ETF|6.38| |CVS Health|5.28| |Gilead|4.39| |BABA (A reminder why I shouldn't average down)|4.28| |iShares MSCI World ETF|3.78| |Cloudflare (at near IPO)|3.52| |Visa|3.51| |Target (bought this week after earnings)|3.21| |Microsoft|3.04| |Costco (started this week after TGT earnings)|2.88| |Novo Nordisk|2.81| |Galapagos (biotech)|2.79| |Google (bought this week)|2.73| |Amazon|2.71| |Bayer|2.02| |GIMV|1.78| |J&J|1.78| |CFE|1.79| |Southwest airlines|1.78| |Budweiser|1.72| |Lockheed Martin|1.61| |Shell|1.58| |Nestle|1.48| |Ageas|1.48| |SAP|1.43| |Nokia|1.25| |Global Therapeutics (GBT)|1.21| |General Dynamics|1.08| |Coca Cola|0.96| |Paypal|0.75| |Some other minor things|the rest|

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

If you’re looking for ESG ratings, you need to look at the top 3 in the space, MSCI, Sustainalytics, and ISS, not the S&P.

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

It would be interesting to compare all those 20 funds and check what they are precisely exposed into. I wouldn't be surprised you can reproduce the exact same exposure with a very few funds only. That's you can see a lot in this sub about the 3-funds portfolio as well as investors mentioning ALL-IN VT or VTI/VXUS, as well as ALL-IN VTI for US total market only (like in A Simple Path to Wealth).

I personally invest into MSCI World for stocks (IWDA for EU investors / URTH for US investors), this is 1 ETF exposed to 1600 large and mid caps in 23 developed countries, which represent about 70 % of the entire global market capitalization. Pretty well diversified enough to me, I know some investors disagree onto that part.

Some ETFs are exposed to all large, mid and small caps in 23 developed countries,
and 24 (25 ?) emerging markets countries, which represent about 99 % of the entire global market capitalization, and that is only 1 ETF as well, such as the VT ETF for US investors or SPYI available for EU investors...

My question would be, why would you feel that much the need to make it overcomplicated ? How do you manage all this ?

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

Tesla’s ESG score at S&P is lower than Exxon’s, but higher than Exxon’s at MSCI and Sustainalytics.

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

TSLA has a medium rating at Sustainalytics and an “A” rating at MSCI. Average at both. I can’t tell which elements are synonyms for DEI (race/sex quotas) and which are for things that I value (selling poison milk to schoolchildren)

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

Does Schwab charge you a fee to buy a 3rd party ETF such as iShares Core MSCI Total International Stock ETF (IXUS)

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

> It’s been handily beaten by the S&P 500 over the last 10 years

that Fidelity fund has a 2014 inception date, so there's not even 10 years of data.

it all depends on which periods you examine, and the last 10 year have been a bull market for US large growth leaning socks. the S&P 500 is fine for US large, but it's hardly the alpha and omega of investing. the fund has been mythologized as this ultimate investing vehicle, but that's highly debatable.

  • LEXCX and DODGX, among a few others, have absolutely trounced the S&P 500 from 1960s to present.

  • small cap value stocks beat the S&P 500 by over 1000% percent in the 1970s. small cap value generally is the best performing equity class over time, while the S&P 500 is dominated by large growth. https://www.advisorperspectives.com/images/content_image/data/7a/7a69a5770223a298179b2a437d20f08b.gif

  • the S&P 500 was flat from 1966-1982, and from 2000-2012. someone retiring in 1999 and 100% in the S&P 500 would be in for a very rough decade.

  • an MSCI AEFE index has beaten the S&P 500 46% of rolling 10 year periods from 1969-2021. https://tweedy.com/resources/library_docs/papers/Dichotomy%20Btwn%20US%20and%20Non-US%20Mar2022.pdf

  • the S&P 500 committee has a bad habit of adding stocks at tops, and selling at bottoms. https://www.researchaffiliates.com/publications/articles/674-buy-high-and-sell-low-with-index-funds

  • the original stocks from the 1957 version of the S&P 500 have outperformed the S&P 500 after all the changes to the index over the years. meaning the Standard & Poor's stock-picking committee is not adding value or alpha for investors. https://www.jstor.org/stable/4480727

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

Yep its hard but i bought more msci world when the index went to 6. Turn of emotions and let the numbers take over.

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

For VXUS - IXUS or ACWX (if you prefer to track MSCI)

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

Thank you, I did and based on your advice above. That led me onto a hyperlinking journey and I found some that I will look into more, including two that are 'green' and in line with Paris Agreement, and two others that are accumulating ETFs also for emerging markets.These ones here:

Vanguard FTSE All-World UCITS ETF; iShares MSCI Emerging Markets ETF-ex China; Pangea Blue Life Energy (1,24% expense ratio, a bit high); Lyxor Net Zero 2050 S&P Europe Climate PAB. The Pangea has a high expense ratio, I suppose it is because it is actively managed, as the other candidates all have 0.2% expense ratio or thereabouts. Anyway I am not sure about all those yet, but they seem worth a closer look.

Can add that yes I do care about my children's future etc etc, so generally will invest in that direction, but growing the investment will also be important as I do believe there will be a market in the future, hence the ETFs you recommend are interesting.

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

Better even - only MSCI World and small caps.

S&P is part of world

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

…. For most of the past decade, Grantham has been skeptical of stock valuations and dismissive of the fervent enthusiasm that accompanied the bull market. After his latest crash call, one post on Twitter listed his sky-is-falling warnings to suggest he’s wrong too often to be taken seriously.

At GMO, which manages about $65 billion, value has been a costly strategy for clients. Only one of firm’s nine equity funds with a five-year track record has outperformed the MSCI World Index, according to Bloomberg data.

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

There is a lot of overlap: nasdaq100 is the largest component of sp500, appl is the biggest component of nasdaq100. You are better off simplifying to just sp500 and world msci.

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

It probably is, but the major indexes are float adjusted:

> The reason, notes Alex Bryan, direct of passive strategies at Morningstar, is that most broad indexes that are affected are float-adjusted and market-cap-weighted, and only a small fraction of Aramco’s market cap is publicly floated. If the firm makes additional equity offerings, its weightings could climb further, but for the time being the impact should be small… > > Within the MSCI All Country World Index, the impact will be even smaller because of that benchmark’s 2,700 constituents. Aramco will have a 0.06% weighting in the MSCI ACWI, ranking as the 353rd largest holding based on the IPO valuation. As a result, there will only be a fractional change in sector weightings.

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

Ok, with very low risk: diversified bond etf portfolio.

Medium: 50% bond etfs 50% world stock etf

High: 100% world stock etf

High high: 100% 2x daily leveraged world stock.

Highest: single stocks.

I love diversifikation, why I would build a leveraged portfolio: 50% msci USA 2x daily, 10% 2x daily s&p500, 10% 2x daily Nasdaq 100, 20% 2x daily 50 Euro Stoxx and 10% 2x daily EM.

With this strategy you will double your beta.

If you start on ATH and a crisis comes it takes time as always but in the long run 10-20 years you will exceed.

2009-2022 1k in s&p500 -> 5k 1k in 2x Daily s&p500 -> 21k

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

Around 50% all market ETFs, 40% individual stocks, 6% cash, the rest are odd positions (inverse ETFs, short position, hedge options).

Long-term, I want to get 55-60% ETFs (MSCI, S&P 500). My cash is reserved for averaging down. In general, I am mostly ok with the risk distribution of my portfolio for the time being, but I adapt to the situation.

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

50% msci world 30% sp500 5% nasdaq100 5% smallcapsvalue 5% individual stocks (aapl, blk, asml)

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

You can ignore those columns.
Geld G-Vol is the volume of the bid side.
Brief B-Vol is the volume of the ask side.
Its the Volume of Users that want to sell or buy a different security. (you dont care about that)
The german/austrian Geld-Brief-Spanne is the same as the english Bid-Ask-Spread.
Hoch/Tief is probably the the highest and lowest price for the etfs of the 52 weeks.

The "MSCI WORLD" Index is fine as a broad market investment, but it does not include developing countries such as e.g. china and stuff.

Theoretically you can simplify by buying: https://www.justetf.com/de/etf-profile.html?isin=IE00B3RBWM25 (95% of the World market, it does not get better than that)

I'd not buy any of those special etfs, usually they have higher costs and lower long term returns.

ISHARES CORE MSCI WORLD ETF and ISHARES MSCI WORLD SRI ETF own almost the same stocks, but one of them is the SRI variant, meaning that "unsustainable" stocks were kicked out. I'd just go with the first one (or the one i meantioned) and drop the others.

Dont know about austrian taxes though as i'm german.

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

Yes, I read that a lot. Then basically the first ETF in the table should do it right?

ISHARES CORE MSCI WORLD ETF (IE00B4L5Y983 - A0RPWH)

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

I did keep some cash in case of further corrections. I invested part in equity index funds ( msci world and s&p500) and quality stocks with steady dividends. I will use the cash to invest in these assets as I expect the corrections to last longer. Also used parts to put in mortgage.

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

You would buy and do nothing. You do nothing for a long time, like 12-15 years and you sell when there is not a crisis like it is now. To minimise risk you want to diversify as much as possible, over different countries and sectors. An etf that tracks the msci world is good. I hold the one from I shares. There is another good one from vanguard.

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

You can invest in India-focused ETFs like iShares MSCI India ETF.

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

You should consider investing in India-focused ETFs like the iShares MSCI India ETF.

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

This is true for essentially all developed markets. Big companies tend to be global. Yet, there’s only a significant mismatch between the US GDP proportion (20 % of the global GDP) and the US stock market proportion (60 % of MSCI AW)

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

What about ETF like iShares MSCI India?

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

Microsoft ($MSFT) and Salesforce.com ($CRM) both have high MSCI ESG ratings, low-risk Sustainalytics ratings and are well-liked by Morningstar and CFRA. I own a fair amount of both.

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

You are right it drives me insane reading comments in here saying “it has to go up” or “if you invest long term and DCA you will make money”.

There is no such thing as certainty in this game. That’s not to say it won’t go up for the next 100 years or down another 100 years. But the amount of blind belief in here that a chaotic system has to do what you want it to do is moronic.

That being said the msci stock world index is probably higher in 5 years time hahaha

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

short msci world I guess

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

Puts on MSCI World

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

Voo qqq berkshier vt vnq arkk komp anew loup ginn dtec moon msci lnsty spgi vfc hlgn bfly nrgv ba fb amzn goog msft xar vcr jepi xyld iipr

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

No, they both track the MSCI US Investable Market Index/Information Technology 25/50 index.

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

Guys any thoughts about the israel market? Israel msci etf all-must the same price before the corona, and the israel economy grow very fast?

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

These are numbers for only the period of one day ! It doesn't mean anything really.

I keep on waiting for my EU position (an old mistake) to get back up, before selling a few of it to purchase monthly a little extra more of my position into MSCI World (the one I really feel good with). But everything keeps turning even more red, so I just wait longer.

Numbers for such a short period of time like one day should never be an argument to promote to "diversify" even more ! This is clearly misleading.

The grass is always greener at the neighbors, I guess...

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

There are lots of books about the stock market in general like “the simple path to wealth”. I’m not a super savvy investor or anything. I just recently dumped 500k in and didn’t DCA or anything. I went with 81 blue chip stocks and they are basically the MSCI (Morgan Stanley Composite Index) with a twist. But the idea is the same. Buy companies that are going to be around for a long time. Buy Microsoft, Apple and Honda and chevron and don’t put more than 5-7% of your money in any one company and more like .5-1% in most. So like I had 10k worth of Netflix. I might lose all of that forever. It’s 5k now… but even if I do I hope to make up for that with Honda or John Deere or something.

Crypto is speculative it’s like gambling. Like putting all your money in Tesla. Be prepared to lose it all when you pick single stocks or speculative things. I might pick up a bit coin…. But it’s coming out of play money.

Also, you don’t need to pay an advisor like I did just pick a vanguard or fidelity index fund and perhaps invest 10-20% of your cash in there for 5-12 months. That’s called DCA. Dollar cost averaging. But if you are a long term investor you want to start that long term as soon as you can.

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

Oh dear you are quite right. There is just so much to think about in these stocks that I overlook a few things and slowly correct my portfolio over time. You are right, the all-world isn't actually as "worldly" as I thought, it's 60% US. So I am extremely skewed towards the US.

Do you think it would perhaps be wise to just remove the 20% all-world and replace it with a European fund like STOXX 600 or MSCI Europe? I would then have US, emerging markets and Europe, which is really diversified.

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

Most ETFs follow an established benchmark, but Wall Street is ever so clever where they start making up their own benchmark, i.e. smart beta. So you have to pick an ETF that follows a well established benchmark, i.e. Sp500, Russell 1000, MSCI, etc... for large caps or Wilshire 5000, MSCI, Russell 3000, etc... for total stock market.

Just pick one of the index funds that that have high AUM (assets under management) as those will be the ones that are your more well established passive benchmarks as mentioned above.

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

> how do I buy VTI

This question makes me think you are asking how to invest at all? VTI is just a financial asset you can buy and sell with a brokerage account. Just like you can go and put in an order for Apple, or Google, a bond fund, or a Target Retirement Date Fund, you can put in an order for VTI.

You don't have to actually have a Vanguard account to buy/sell VTI even though VTI is a product made by Vanguard. In fact, you can buy VTI (or VXUS or VT or ...) on pretty much any brokerage like Fidelity, Schwab, TD Ameritrade or app like Robinhood or M1Finance.

In fact, VTI is just an index fund that tracks a total US stock market index (as defined by the CRSP US Total Market Index in the case of Vanguard). There are many other products like ITOT from the iShares organization (managed by Blackrock), SCHB from Schwab, FSKAX or FZROX from Fidelity, the mutual fund version of VTI called VTSAX from Vanguard, etc.

All of these track some type of total US Stock market index, you just have to pick which company whose product you want. Once you picked a company, you can buy their product on any of the brokerages. So you can buy VTI on Fidelity, FSKAX on Vanguard, SCHB on TD Ameritrade, etc.

Similarly, VT is the Vanguard product that tracks a global stock market index (there are a few, MSCI, CRSP, even the S&P company has one). You can buy VT from any brokerage. And on any brokerage, you can buy any version of VT that another company offers, like Schwab (SWTSX) or iShare's ACWI.

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

Msci world is down -8% this month

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

More or less a standard globally diversified etf portfolio. The best you can do if you do not want to / have time or skills to analyze stocks, which should apply for the majority of private investors. Additionally, you have a the robotics etf, which essentially is a bet on the automatization sector. Could be great in the long term, but is probably not doing good since the beginning of the year.
Would you explain the logic behind having the S&P500 and the emerging markets etf. Typically, people have an msci world or an all world etf, which are quite US heavy (the all world etf less so). As a counterbalance, they then add an emerging markets etf. From this perspective, the S&P 500 seems odd. Is it a hidden bet against the european market?

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

All of them (MSCI World Index)

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

Index in local currency and a few % in VOO which I shouldn't have bought but don't want to sell. Then on top I have complimentary retirement plan capped, invested in MSCI total world (VT not available) and base retirement contributions based on the salary (can't touch this one before retirement essentially)

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

Don’t be a hero here and just focus on stuff like GOOG AMZN CRM NOW ADSK ADBE if you have the money stream to buy through this pain. Even stuff like MSCI SPGI are looking great from returns perspective

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

🇨🇳

The MSCI gauge for China stocks has fallen 28% since October. Instead of seeing opportunity in lower valuations, many big investors still aren't buying, even those who were formerly bullish on the region.

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

Is EZJ the right ticker? That's an ETF for Japanese companies. ProShares Ultra MSCI Japan. It's trading at $30/sh.

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

Crypto is a sham, MSCI world isn't interesting at all, invest in oil and buy the dip on solid tech businesses

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

Hey everyone, I am working on my first portfolio to invest 700€ into each month. (23 year old)

This is what I came up with so far:

45% MSCI World

20% MSCI EM

15% Crypto (BTC 7,5/ETH 7,5)

10% VNQ ( Vanguard Real Estate Index Fund ETF )

5% Gold

5% Bonds

Is it too much crypto? I just feel like its a good investment. I work in that space so....I like to have some more risk and this should just kinda be something I wont touch for 15 years at least.

No debt, I have 20k€ cash laying around as well and currently hold some random stocks including uranium, NFTs or meme stocks.

Also I dont know how I feel about Gold or Bonds. Should I just add those 10% to MSCI World?

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

Even after the MSCI World has lost 16% from its peak, stocks are still not really cheap if you use the Buffett ratio, which divides the global stock market cap by the global GDP. With 122%, the Buffett indicator is above the 100% threshold.

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

>Though myriad independent forces may shape stock prices in the short term, in the long term, returns are a function of companies' profitability.

Are you buying all companies at the same prices? If unprofitable companies are sufficiently cheap, they can have higher expected returns than profitable ones (because their future earnings are being discounted at a higher rate, and that's all an expected return is - a discount rate).

>Stock prices of unprofitable companies reflect the market's bet that that company will return to profitability.

And they often do. It's why systematic value strategies have done so well over the last 200 or so years. Cheap companies, which are usually unprofitable, tend to migrate out of the value portfolio and make value investors money in the short run regardless of their long term performance (by that time, systematic value investors have already moved on to the next unprofitable company). Value isn't strictly an "anti-profitability" strategy (those have indeed done poorly), but it just shows that buying profitable companies and selling unprofitable ones isn't an arbitrage and it doesn't benefit from a universal law of markets that determines relative performance.

> An environment that facilitates more efficient profit-generation (the USA) should therefore generate more returns for investors than an environment that imposes greater barriers to profitability (Europe).

Looking at true profitability strategies (RmW), empirically, there have been many periods (in the US at least) where low profitability companies have earned higher returns than high profitability companies, like 1972-1984, 1988-Feb. 2000, Sept. 2011 - Feb. 2021. Again, even over relatively long periods of time, this isn't an arbitrage like you make it out to be.

Also, US stocks aren't even particularly profitable (using forward profit margins) compared to Canadian stocks, Australian stocks, Indonesian stocks, Czech stocks, Danish stocks, Egyptian stocks, Hong Kong stocks, Hungarian stocks, Israeli stocks, Malaysian stocks, New Zealand stocks, Peruvian stocks, Philippines stocks, Russian stocks, Singaporean stocks, South African stocks and Swiss stocks. That's over a third of countries included in the MSCI ACWI that are (in aggregate) more profitable than the US, including a few in Europe. Hardly an example of American exceptionalism. If you wanted profitability exposure and had to make country bets, why not overweight these?

But even if all this doesn't concern you (and assuming that the US is indeed the country with the most profitable companies in aggregate), and you just want to buy only the most profitable companies, why would you express that view by concentrating in US stocks or even countries at all? I don't really see how you answered my question there. Your strategy a classic two-step bet. Instead of just buying the profitable US companies and the profitable European countries (they exist) while excluding all unprofitable companies, betting that the US environment creates profitability (which is only true in aggregate) means you end up owning both profitable and unprofitable US companies while excluding both profitable and unprofitable European companies. Hardly ideal if you just wanted to make a profitability bet (because you get weaker profitability exposure and an unwanted country bet). Admittedly, this reasoning only works if you believe that past firm-level profitability is a good predictor of future profitability, but this is standard thinking in pretty much every asset pricing model that uses profitability (FF5 and q^5). Do you have any evidence that past country-level profitability is a better predictor of future firm-level profitability than past firm-level profitability itself? Because that's what you need if you want to replace a profitability screen with a country screen in constructing a profitability-tilted portfolio.

Also, supply side asset pricing would tell you that profitability is only a good predictor of a firm's cost of capital when combined with investment. A highly profitable firm with low investment most likely has a high cost of capital (because those two factors imply that a firm has fewer positive NPV investment opportunities than its competitors), but the same cannot be said of a highly profitable firm with high investment (it could have many positive NPV investment opportunities because of a low cost of capital). Can't look at one without the other.

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

>Edit... I think you performed like the msci world since 2008

I can see why youre not good at this. Math is our friend.

Even if you cherry picked the absolute bottom of the 2009 crash and applied that to your comparison, then the MSCI barely hit about 250% cumulative gains since March 2009. Im sitting at well over 3000% in that time frame... yes thats thousand and no its not a typo and yes I am a millionaire and not Im not super rich. Unfortunately, I started with little money. No I didnt gamble. No penny stocks. No naked options. And yes I have made bad moves.

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

Company A has a market cap of 10B and earns 1B a year, all of which it pays out in dividends (10% yield). Company A is American. Company B has a market cap of 5B and earns 800M a year, all of which it pays out in dividends (16% yield). Company B is foreign. In both cases, all you get is the dividend, there is no share price appreciation and the dividend doesn’t grow. By your logic you would choose Company A, which is just wrong.

I don’t know why you don’t understand my points. I systematically addressed each of your claims and showed that they’re wrong. What time frames are too small? The AQR article literally looks at the longest possible sample for which EAFE CAPE can be calculated. Ritter’s sample is indeed a bit short but his work has been reproduced in older historical data in this MSCI paper.. Other conclusions like high investment predicting low cost of capital is entirely theory based (Zhang’s Investment CAPM) but also have strong empirical support.

Re intl. outperformance. There is no way to show that they outperform US stocks unless you look at extremely short sub-periods, which I won’t do. However, the fact that historical US outperformance came from multiples expansion suggests that the difference in realized returns between US and ex-US is not predictive of their expected returns.

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

Plenty of other options to get foreign exposure. INDA for India. AFK for Africa. EMXC for EM ex-China. iShares also has single country ETFs for almost all DM markets that follow MSCI indexes like EWC for Canada. There are plenty of OK-sounding reasons people give to avoid something like VXUS or VEA, but when the alternatives are staring them in the face and yet they still cling to domestic stocks, you have to wonder if there aren’t some other reasons for which they’re avoiding intl. stocks.

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

“I’m sorry, no offense, but I don’t think you understand how economies grow.”

Differences in economic growth isn’t what drives differences in country-level stock returns. Economic growth has even historically been negative correlated to returns. Ritter paper. There are many possible explanations for this, including the fact that growth from new enterprise creation isn’t captured by equity investors (if a new company lists or takes the place of one that goes bankrupt, you need to invest new dollars into the new company, so you don’t benefit) + corporate over-investment (pursuit of growth isn’t even it isn’t a positive NPV process) + increased competition between firms caused by technological advances + many more. Second Ritter paper if you want a few more.

“Innovation is what grows companies (Apple, Google, Disney, Walmart, Boeing, Caterpillar, etc.)”

It may be what drives asset growth, but that’s not returns.

“Big, innovative companies that dominate globally almost all come from America.”

Firstly, I simply don’t think that’s true. How are you even defining innovation? Or are you just picking stocks to fit your false narrative? Because of the 25 companies with the most patents last year, 13 were foreign, including 7 of the top 10 (Samsung, LG, Canon, Huawei, TSMC, Toyota and Sony).

“They build and sell their products internationally.”

And the exact same thing is true of foreign girls too.

“They grow their balance sheets over time.”

That’s asset growth not returns. Not sure why you’re using this as a reason to only invest in US stocks. Historically, asset growth has even tended to negatively predict returns. (Which makes a lot of sense, all else equal lower investment means a firm has fewer positive NPV opportunities than it’s competitors which means it’s cost of capital is higher). Expected returns are just a discount rate (stochastic discount factor) and are not related to asset growth.

“And when they fail, another American company takes over (Tesla, SpaceX, Pfizer, Merck, Netflix for example).”

And investors don’t benefit from new enterprise creation sadly. How are you getting your SpaceX exposure again? Also, let’s just dispel the myth that it’s a few innovative companies that drive the performance of the market. Look at the MSCI USA EW. Then look at your 30 most innovative companies, for example. They may make up a large portion of cap weighted indexes, but they’ll be about 5% of the EW index. If they were responsible for all of the market’s performance, the EW index should do terribly, but it hasn’t. These large innovative companies are responsible for a large % of net wealth creation because they’re so big, but they don’t drive returns. Also, let’s look at why the US has beaten foreign stocks over the last 40 years. It looks like innovation. It’s not. 80% of the US’s annualized 2.1% outperformance over EAFE came from multiples expansion. (source = p.6)

“The citizens of India, Russia, Brazil, and China do not spend nearly the amount of money Americans do. They might spend a higher percentage relative to GDP, but that’s only because their countries GDP is so much lower that America. But in terms of real dollars, it’s not even close.”

Firstly, why should household spending even affect discount rates? But even if stock returns were linked to household spending (and no one here has produced a shred of evidence or even intuition that they are), the Indian, Russian, Brazilian and Chinese markets are a lot smaller than the US by market cap to reflect this difference in spending. Your argument would only make sense if the Indian and Brazilian companies were trading at the exact same market caps as their American competitors, but they’re not. Tata doesn’t have the market cap of Ford or GM or Tesla. These are much smaller markets.

“Here’s an interesting statistic. In America, if you work 40 hours a week and make minimum wage, you are in the top 14% of the wealthiest people in the world. That’s $15,000 USD a year. You are already wealthier that 86% of the rest of the world.”

Which is great for the quality of life of Americans. And that’s it. How should this affect discount rates? Or maybe you think it affects earnings or sales or other flows? You’re right. American companies do have higher earnings, sales, cashflows, etc. than their foreign competitors. But they’re also priced much higher. As an investor, you don’t care about the earnings, sales, cashflows, etc. the entire company generates, just what your small slice of it does, and that’s why the price you pay matters. For example, Apple generating 100B a year in earnings vs Samsung generating only 35B isn’t advantageous to Apple because it costs a lot more to buy a specific $ amount of Apple earnings vs Samsung earnings.

“There is no other country with the global economic impact and domestic spending of America.”

No, which is why it’s already a pretty sizeable % of the global index. But that shouldn’t have an impact on expected returns or the discount rates applied to US stocks.

“Hate on America all you want, but it’s true.”

Just hating on the ignorant reasons people are giving to hate on foreign stocks.

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

I use Fidelity as well, although that was purely because I wanted MSCI rather than FTSE because of how they differ in their treatment of emerging markets.

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

Right now, 80% of the MSCI EAFE is in 4 currencies: EUR, JPY, GBP and CHF. One or many of these currencies could rapidly fall against the dollar, but (and I have no justification for this other than common sense) it's probably about as likely as the opposite happening, and that's the risk you take when you only own dollar-denominated assets. Also, you can hedge FX risk and if some exogenous event really created a currency crisis that affected one of the four, what makes you think that paying attention will help you at all? Markets are good at quickly incorporating this kind of information into prices, political knowledge can't compete with event-driven HFT.

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

In an efficient market, those lower profit margins would already be reflected in prices, and seeing that relative to the MSCI USA, the MSCI Europe index is trading at a 26% discount on price to earnings, a 42% discount on CAPE, a 51% discount on price to dividends and a 54% discount on price to book, that's probably already happened. Perhaps not fully though, and there is a large amount of theoretical and empirical evidence that suggest that profitable companies should and do outperform. However, if profitability matters, why buy both the profitable and unprofitable US companies when you can just buy the profitable US and European companies?

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

There are some country specific index funds, though they may be higher ER than multi-coutnry ones. Example: https://www.ishares.com/us/products/239621/ishares-msci-denmark-capped-etf

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

MSCI is an index. VTI is an ETF that tracks an index (not MSCI). There are other vanguard funds that track MSCI indexes.

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

Why is VTI better as say MSCI ?

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

> Most don't go back that far

umm...

>There have been numerous multi-year periods where non-US returns have significantly outpaced their US counterparts. Moreover, as you can see in the chart below, on a rolling ten-year return basis between December 31, 1969 and March 31, 2022, the S&P 500 outperformed the MSCI EAFE Index only 54% of the time.

https://tweedy.com/resources/library_docs/papers/Dichotomy%20Btwn%20US%20and%20Non-US%20Mar2022.pdf

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

This is not an acceptable answer. If at all possible I'd like this question not to turn into a string of comments talking about how VTI/MSCI World are generally better options.

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

WSJ:

> "Indonesia is among the world’s best-performing emerging markets this year, as global stock investors pile into a market buoyed by commodity exports and a huge domestic consumer base.

> The MSCI Indonesia Index has risen about 12% in dollar terms this year through Thursday, while the benchmark compiler’s broader emerging-markets gauge is down 14%, data from Refinitiv shows.

> Meanwhile, flows from foreign institutional investors into equities in the Southeast Asian nation reached $5 billion in January through April, according to Goldman Sachs. That is nearly double 2021’s full-year total and contrasts with outflows across emerging Asia of $47.8 billion"

Diversify your portfolio internationally!

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

THD (ishares msci etf thailand) will rise since tourist quarantine restrictions are now gone as of this past Monday. 21% of the precovid economy was based on tourism. I live here and everything is busier and the expectations is that travel will actually increase over precovid levels. The etf is at a 20% discount on precovid so good price. And the government was so strict initially that there is a zero chance that new tourist entrance requirements come back.

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

>As with life, there is an ebb and a flow to investing. This dichotomy between US and non-US returns has not always favored the United States. There have been numerous multi-year periods where non-US returns have significantly outpaced their US counterparts. Moreover, as you can see in the chart below, on a rolling ten-year return basis between December 31, 1969 and March 31, 2022, the S&P 500 outperformed the MSCI EAFE Index only 54% of the time.

https://tweedy.com/research/papers_speeches.php

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

I actually dont know if this is dependent on where you are in the world. Sometimes you can even do that with the bank you are at. Just look for ones that dont charge anything for those automated monthly investments and choose a large ETF like MSCI world.

maybe its best if you spend like 1 hour of research on your own for broker and which ETF to choose, then you dont have to trust a stranger on reddit :)

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

And this is a typical myopic American view. US is being thrown out of everywhere without any nuclear war or other apocalyptic visions. Look at smartphones. Back in 2010 iPhone was a technological leader, the smartphone. Nowadays there are hundreds of different smartphones; technological advantages and quality are found elsewhere. Iphones became just cameras. Japanese-made cameras. They are no longer a technological masterpieces, they're not a design accessory. They're just a part of the ecosystem which is hardly usable to those who tried more modern and flexible systems. The world does not need our companies any more in the same sense they needed us in 1980s, 1990s and even 2010s. They have more modern, more capable, more profitable non-American companies.

Look at the pinnacle of our civilization - microchip production. Who's the leader on this market? Taiwan, the mighty TSMC. If China takes Taiwan there will be no nuking, you just won't have modern computers while the rest of the world will have them. Have you heard about 'supply chain problems' lately? It's only an American and UK problem. There's no empty shelves for friends of China. Who's the biggest producer of EV? China. Who produces industrial automation (robots)? Japan and Germany. Who's the leader in industry automation? Korea. What car you will gladly purchase? Any except American. See? WWIII has started years ago and we're slowly but inevitably losing because we are not the supplier of everything anymore. Why the world trade is still conducted in USD if the biggest trading bloc is RCEP and the US does not play the former role? The day oil and metals will be sold for another currency will not be the day of nukes and end of the world, but the end of the US as you know it.

An alternative for the next decade is anything non-American. MSCI indices outside of US, emerging and frontier markets, India, commodities - I don't know what will shoot to the moon but it's inevitably that the next decade for us will resemble 1999-2009 rather than 2009-2019.

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

This. Let's think about growth for a minute and what sector needs to grow faster: Renewables vs. Fossil Fuels. Renewables make up a fraction of current energy production. Energy Demand will continue to increase for the foreseeable future. Renewables are going to take up an increasing larger fraction of total Energy Production which means they need to grow faster than overall Energy Production.

It's a typical S Curve Market Adoption: Renewables are still in the Innovator and Early Adoption. Yeah, Renewables only have limited Market Share - but why would anyone assume that they're not going to enter a Growth Stage?

>JPM Chair of Market and Investment Strategy Michael Cembalest says "ignore all the hype" in the energy transition (to renewable energy), "with energy demand still in excess of supply, I believe the MSCI Global Energy Composite will outperform both renewable energy stocks and the broad equity market (SPY) again over the next year."

There is the key qualifier - over the next year. Sure, Fossil Fuels will rally in the near term based on commodity shocks, but there is nothing to suggest that this is anything but a short-term play over the next 50 Years. So, if you wanna make some money in the next few years, then do Energy Commodities. But, over the next 50 Years renewables are going to outperform Energy Commodities.

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

For an average of 10% ROI, I'd rather get shares from an MSCI world ETF.

At least I know it is legit, and you canreally pull out anytime.

Even if the company is legit, which usually is doubtful, the difference in risk between both investments makes it pretty clear to steer away.

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

80% MSCI All Country All World 20% Ethereum

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

Cash is paying ca. minus 7-8% right now. The interest rates are rising in many countries. We are likely to be heading for a recession (In UK, USA & Europe). Stocks will be the best long term place to be. (> 5 years), but we could be in for more volatility over the next year or two.

Trading platform comparison

https://monevator.com/compare-uk-cheapest-online-brokers/

Consider one or two of these world ETFs as a good place to start. (There are others).

HSBC MSCI World UCITS ETF

https://markets.ft.com/data/etfs/tearsheet/summary?s=HMWO:LSE:GBX

Invesco FTSE RAFI All World 3000 UCITS ETF

https://markets.ft.com/data/etfs/tearsheet/holdings?s=PSRW:LSE:GBX

Xtrackers MSCI World Minimum Volatility UCITS ETF 1C

https://markets.ft.com/data/etfs/tearsheet/summary?s=XDEB:LSE:GBX

Xtrackers MSCI World Value UCITS ETF 1C

https://markets.ft.com/data/etfs/tearsheet/holdings?s=XDEV:LSE:GBX

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

Msci World or vanguard alternative+ I think some of them pay a dividend every 3Q.

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

MSCI world

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

I found some info but yeah no tickers apparently….

“They correspond respectively to the S&P 500, the Russell 2500, the MSCI ACWI ex-U.S.” referring to those three funds. They are passively managed. I’d say those are a good selection and I’d stick with the 50/10/40 ratio which accords decently with VT (total world market) or 55/15/30 or something similar. That is US Large/US mid and small/ex US. These are probably quite good funds. And they are cheap.

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

I'm a fan of the Bogleheads approach. I don't have a total market fund in my 401(k), so I ended up making it myself. It ended up something like this:

60% S&P 500 Index 7% Domestic Mid-Cap Index 3% Domestic Small-Cap Index 30% MSCI EAFE Index

Your fund list will probably have similar choices, but we would need to see a screenshot of your options to know for sure.

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

This has 828 with a large cap developed slant and a 0.32 ER

https://www.ishares.com/us/products/239623/ishares-msci-eafe-etf

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

https://www.ishares.com/us/products/239677/ishares-msci-russia-capped-etf

Sometimes quite a bit.

https://www.blackrock.com/ca/investors/en/products/239481/ishares-china-index-etf

Sometimes more.

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow

Oh, I live in Japan and invest in the FTSE all cap, MSCI ACWI.

During the bubble, there wasn`t much awareness or general investing knowledge, just momentum and hype.

Also most Japanese are monolingual, it creates an insular view and limits access to outside information

The fallout of the bubble? Everyone here is freaking terrified of investing. All cash in the bank.

1
Reply
Share
Report
Save
Follow
Recent Tweets
Top analyst price target today...🧧 👇👇👇 ✅https://t.co/gWHSxfyJEK $MSCI
0
0
0
$MSCI Trading Ideas | Awaiting Short signal. 100% Profitability based on 3 trades. Profit factor is 100. Learn more at https://t.co/DVMdCgEFTI. https://t.co/M3WUsaqrHp
0
0
0
$MSCI MSCI To Participate In Deutsche Bank Global Financial Services Conference Stock News Alerts In Bio
0
0
0
Companies with the highest linear FCF growth: - Qualys $QLYS - Cadence Designs $CDNS - Technology One ASX:TNE - MSCI $MSCI - Aspen Tech $AZPN R-squared = 0.99 for all the above
9
8
122
Terry Smith - Fundsmith Posiciones en cartera a 31 de Marzo de 2022 Bought: $ADBE $MTD Added to: $MASI $WING $PAYC $CGNX $ANSS $MSCI $SABR https://t.co/S8I1I7Widl
0
1
5
Investors move from unbranded to branded (safe) ETFs during downturns/periods of volatility. $SPGI $MSCI https://t.co/D42BG2YtWz
1
2
13
These 20 companies returned 25%+ CAGR over the past 5 years even after taking into account their current steep drawdown (-40% to -75%): $AAPS $XPEL $TTD $EVVTY $CROX $AMD $ETSY $NVDA $NVCR $TEAM $SQ $PAYC $MSCI $OKTA $ZBRA $MELI $INTU $WING $VEEV Incredible run. https://t.co/wpvYohLXpP
8
43
250
Reflected I want to get into a diversified Compounder Bros™️ port for my 401k rollover instead of pure software so this is the new updated plan — all equal weight: $GOOG $AMZN $NOW $CRM $MSCI $SPGI $FICO $CMG $DPZ $NVDA $CP $V Comes out to 3.28% cumulative CY22 FCF yield
11
12
109
$MSCI shallow-dive. A lot of the companies I invest in are a standard and are entrenched in a system. Another company I’ve been looking into, MSCI, is no different. MSCI index segment makes up ~60% of revenue and ~80% of operating profit and is entrenched in the financial system. https://t.co/abbNRbdokD
3
9
116
Why would you want to try and pick #stocks? You can own them all with ETFs: - $VTI - $VTWO - $SPY - $MSCI - $IWDA Keep #investing simple. Lower risk, high returns.
3
5
21
People always ask me how Im positioned. This is it, even sold my loved $HUBS bc this isn't the environment for small caps. $GOOG $MSFT $BLK $AAPL $BX $TROW $KKR $JPM $TXN $MSCI $MCO + alot of $AMZN 2024 leaps. nothing fancy and yes I have both goog/googl bc of split years back https://t.co/jTSCrzqfmn
28
12
142
💰20 Dividend Growth Stocks💰 $V 💳 $PG 🧼 $DG 💰 $HD 👷🏻‍♂️ $MA 💳 $JNJ 💊 $IBM 🔵 $WM ♻️ $NEE ⚡️ $LHX 🚀 $TXN 💾 $LOW 👷🏻‍♂️ $CTAS 🧯 $MSCI 📈 $MMM 😷 $SBUX ☕️ $ABBV 💊 $COST 🛒 $MSFT ☁️ $AVGO 🏙
32
147
777
Don’t forget #AMC $AMC is being added to the $MSCI #MSCI global index on Tues 8/31. #FOMO #MOASS #HODL 📈📈📈🚀🚀🚀💎💎💎🦍🦍🦍 https://t.co/hsaZY49PL8
9
40
128
Here's what the traders are buying first thing tomorrow morning. $SHAK $AAL $MSCI $NEM https://t.co/bNgI16wmAs
11
18
48
Quick 5:1 r:r today off $MSCI from the WInternomics stock list 🙏 You can still find him at -> https://t.co/UIrWidhiBw https://t.co/QZUA60sGGP
0
24
45